19 January 2021
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6 September 2021
Organic World Congress 2021

New date! Postponed from September 2020



30 July 2020
ORC welcomes the National Food Strategy

The first major reviewof our food system in 75 years

24 July 2020
The future of organic farming and the environment

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29 April 2020
Tim Bennett is the new Chair of ORC

Former NFU president takes on chairmanship of Organic Research Centre

For whom? Questioning the food and farming research agenda

Category: News
10 January 2018

How can food and farming research deliver for the long-term public good? And how can we build a high-quality research agenda which strengthens a food system that serves people, the planet and animals? ‘For whom? Questioning the food and farming research agenda' from the Food Ethics Council brings together the thoughts and opinions of 32 experts, in a special magazine.

The Food Ethics Council asked international experts to explore where the power lies in setting our food and farming research agenda. They also asked 'who benefits from both publicly and privately funded research?' They believe the status quo research agenda is not delivering the public good required for a food system that serves the needs of people, planet and animals.

This collection of articles starts addressing key questions about how the research agenda is set in food and farming, unmasking and challenging the dominant research paradigm, and highlighting inclusive alternatives to deliver public good.

Key questions explored include: Who sets the food and farming research agenda? How do we ensure important voices are heard? What might an ethical research agenda for food and farming look like?

ORC's Nic Lampkin and Susanne Padel contribute a piece entitled 'How to unlock the contribution of agroecology in farming?'

This report is aimed at research institutions, funding bodies, government officials, CSOs and anyone with an interest in redefining the research agenda for the public good, especially in post-Brexit UK.

For more information and to download the report here

Keywords: Public goods research agenda

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