5 June 2019
Integrating Farming and Forestry

Farm Woodland Forum annual meeting

2 July 2019
Trees and Livestock - Buckinghamshire

Agroforestry Innovation Network Meeting



16 May 2019
Organic farming statistics 2018

Defra releases estimates of the land area farmed organically, crop areas, livestock numbers and numbers of organic producers and processors in the UK

10 May 2019
Agroecological transitions

Five case studies of farmers' experiences published



21 March 2019
In adversity, what are farmers doing to be more resilient?

Opportunities, barriers and constraints in organic techniques helping to improve the sustainability of conventional farming

Organic crop yields can be closer to conventional than thought

Category: News
10 December 2014


The yields of organic farms, particularly those growing multiple
crops, compare well to those of chemically intensive agriculture,
according to a new UC Berkeley analysis

New study found multi-cropping and crop rotation can substantially reduce yield gap

ORC welcomes the publication of a new study by Berkeley University on the yield gap between organic and conventional farming. This new study based on larger meta-analysis than previous studies found that yield differences vary between crop types and management practices, with no significant differences found for yields of leguminous versus non-leguminous crops, perennials versus annuals or developed versus developing countries. Instead, they found the novel result that two agricultural diversification practices, multi-cropping and crop rotations, substantially reduce the yield gap (to 9 4% and 8 5%, respectively) when the methods were applied in only organic systems.

This confirms that there is potential to improve the productivity of organic farming by improving practices. The authors conclude that appropriate investment in agroecological research to improve organic management systems could greatly reduce or eliminate the yield gap for some crops or regions.

Keywords: yield gap rotation multi-cropping agroecology

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